ExpoVinisLast week saw the 17th edition of ExpoVinis, Brazil’s biggest wine fair, finish with news of a change of organisation for 2014.
Exponor, the current organisers, have sold the rights to run the fair to a consortium composed of Brazil’s BTS Informa and France’s Comexposium.
The new owners have committed to run the fair once again during its traditional April time slot, using the same venue, São Paulo’s Expo Center Norte. They are also aspiring to increase the participation of international exhibitors and to look more closely at the qualifications of those attending the fair. The second part of these pledges will be welcome news for some exhibitors, who reported last week at the fair that allowing the public in during half of the second and third days can distract from the core objective of doing business.
Indeed, as the Brazilian market matures, it may be time for a re-evaluation of the fair’s objectives. In its current form, the fair is not currently the place to go if you want to sample the leading wines already imported into Brazil, as very few of Brazil’s largest and most important importers take up stands at the fair. With the wine offer in Brazil arguably expanding at a faster rate than Brazilian consumers’ ability to absorb them, it is likely that many visiting producers will find it harder to secure listings than in the past.
Beyond tutored tastings, many of which are open only to paying ticket holders, the fair offers few events targeted specifically at the trade. There are few opportunities for professionals to engage in pertinent industry issues in an open forum, given the absence of seminars like those hosted by Wine Intelligence at LIWF or ProWein, and the local trade do not have a media outlet capable of coordinating fair events in the same way that Meininger Verlag, Harpers, Drink Business etc., do so internationally.
On the first day of ExpoVinis, Wine Intelligence’s Brazil Country Manager, Paul Medder, was invited to speak across town at the third annual wine debate organized by São Paulo’s commerce federation. The event, charismatically hosted by local wine personality Didú Russo, was well attended by a mix of locals and visitors. The presentation of excerpts from Wine Intelligence’s new Doing Business in Brazil report was enthusiastically received, and showed the level of interest for insights into Brazilian consumer behaviour.
As the Brazilian market evolves, it welcomes a fair where all leading players are encouraged to participate. Improvements in target audience, exhibitor profile, events agenda, facilities and infrastructure will all be key factors in the success of such a fair.
For more about the new Doing Business in Brazil report, please click this link.